Zarif Says Iran to Pursue National Interests in Geneva Talks

News ID: 165919 Service: Nuclear
محمد جواد ظریف

TEHRAN (Tasnim) – Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said on Monday before leaving Tehran for Geneva that Iran’s main objecting in upcoming talks is ensuring the country’s national interests, as the Iranian team has just left Tehran for Switzerland.

“A tough job has been kick-started and we need the support and praying of the whole Iranian nation and our political elites, because these talks must lead to good results and should be pursued in a way to ensure the national interests and ensure the people’s wellbeing,” Zarif said.

“We need that many of our friends pay attention to the national interests, refrain from making hurried judgments and let the interactions to proceed smoothly.”

Iran and the G5+1 - the US, Britain, France, Russia, China and Germany- are to hold fresh nuclear talks on October 15-16. European Union foreign policy Chief Catherine Ashton will chair the Group 5+1 during talks with Iran.

Iran's Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif is to lead Iran's nuclear team at the new round of negotiations. He will attend only the opening session on Tuesday and the rest of the talks will be held between deputies if the six world powers are not represented at the level of foreign ministers.

According to reports, Zarif and  Catherine Ashton - who represents the G5+1 in the talks - will meet on Monday evening at a dinner.

The Iranian team includes Deputy Foreign Minister for Euro-American Affairs Majid Takht Ravanchi, Deputy Foreign Minister for Legal and International Affairs Abbas Araqchi, Director General for International Political Affairs Hamid Baeedinejad, Legal Advisor to Foreign Minister Davoud Mohammadnia and Mohammad Amiri from the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran (AEOI).

On Sunday, Araqchi reaffirmed the Islamic Republic’s right to enrich uranium for peaceful purposes on its soil, saying that sending nuclear material abroad was Iran's red line, but that the country was ready to show flexibility on other aspects of its nuclear program.

"We will negotiate about the form, quantity and different levels of enrichment, but shipping out the (nuclear) material is our red line," Araqchi stated.

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