Iranian Negotiator Briefs Parliament on Implementation of Geneva Deal

TEHRAN (Tasnim) – An Iranian deputy foreign minister and one of the country's top nuclear negotiators in the talks with the six world powers attended a Tuesday session of the parliament's National Security and Foreign Policy Commission to brief its members on the Geneva nuclear deal.

Iranian Negotiator Briefs Parliament on Implementation of Geneva Deal

Iran's Deputy Foreign Minister Seyed Abbas Araqchi held a meeting with members of the parliamentary commission today and provided the lawmakers with the necessary information about the history of the painstaking negotiations between Iran and the Group 5+1 (the US, Britain, France, Russia and China plus Germany) that led to an ultimately landmark deal two months ago.

The two sides had on November 24, 2013, signed a six-month deal on Tehran’s nuclear program based on which the world powers agreed to suspend some non-essential sanctions and to impose no new nuclear-related bans in return for Tehran's decision to freeze parts of its nuclear activities and to allow more inspection of its nuclear facilities.

The Geneva deal, which has come to effect since January 20, also stipulates that over the course of six months, Iran and the six countries will draw up a comprehensive nuclear deal which will lead to a lifting of the whole sanctions on Iran and Tehran will provide the world verifiable guarantees that its nuclear program is solely for peaceful purposes.

Seyed Hossein Naqavi Hosseini, the rapporteur of the parliament's national security and foreign policy commission, quoted Araqchi as saying in the Tuesday session that none of the negotiating parties in the nuclear talks have released details of the Geneva deal so far.

According to the lawmaker, Araqchi has also stressed that the final decisions on the Geneva deal has been made in coordination with high-ranking authorities.

Based on the interim deal, the world powers agreed to suspend some non-essential sanctions and to impose no new nuclear-related bans in return for Tehran's decision to suspend its 20% enrichment for a period of six months.

Such relief would include suspension of some restrictions on trade in gold, precious metals and petrochemicals, and in the auto industry. The deal allows third-country purchases of Iranian oil to remain at current levels. Some $4.2 billion in oil revenues would be allowed to be transferred to Iran.

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