Iranian Official Urges West to Set Aside Excessive Demands in N. Talks

News ID: 372011 Service: Nuclear
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VIENNA (Tasnim) – An informed official close to the Iranian team of negotiators engaged in the ongoing nuclear talks with six world powers called on the Westerners to avoid excessive demands and gain a better understanding of the realities on the ground.

The West should set aside the excessive demands and make a correct assessment of the realities on the ground, the informed official said in the Austrian capital on Friday.

The official, however, noted that eruption of conflicting views over an important issue such as the nuclear discussion was "natural".

“But” the official underlined “given the recent developments, the Westerners seemed to have gained a degree of realism, though it has not apparently happened so far.”

The informed official made it clear that the Western parties still have the opportunity to exercise realism.

He further dismissed as speculations the figures some media outlets have reported about issues relevant Iran’s nuclear program, saying those information "lack credibility and authenticity".

Some media outlets, affiliated with the Western countries, have claimed that one of the sticking points in the talks between Iran and the Group 5+1 (Russia, China, the US, Britain, France and Germany) would be the number of Iran’s centrifuge machines.

They have also alleged that Tehran has about 10,000 centrifuges running, saying the West wants that number trimmed to the low thousands.

Iranian officials have repeatedly voiced opposition to the West’s illogical demands in the course of talks on Tehran’s peaceful nuclear program.

Back in November, after Iran and the six nations inked an interim nuclear deal in the Swiss city of Geneva, Supreme Leader of the Islamic Revolution Ayatollah Seyed Ali Khamenei underscored that always "resistance against excessive demands” should be regarded as an indicator which sets “the direct line" for the relevant officials who handle the nuclear negotiations.

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