Adviser: Strong Popular Opposition to Raise Cost of War for US

News ID: 137542 Service: Politics
جوانی

TEHRAN (Tasnim) – Given the widespread global opposition to Washington’s plan for taking military action against Syria, the US would definitely come out of a possible intervention in Syria as a loser, a senior adviser at the Islamic Revolution Guards Corps (IRGC) said.

Speaking to Tasnim on Tuesday, General Yadollah Javani argued that the previous wars the US and its allies started in the region resulted in failure for them and the invaders incurred "huge losses."

He went on to say that when the US and its allies invaded Afghanistan and Iraq, no country opposed them, but the Syrian case is "completely different" as many countries, groups and parties now lend their support to Syria’s legitimate government.

“In attack against Afghanistan, the US had a number of allies and had received the (UN) Security Council permission for assault; however, in Syria, it (the US) not only lacks the Security Council permission, but also faces the global community’s opposition,” the IRGC official added.

General Javani further touched on the widespread opposition to US military scheme, saying the United Nations, many European states, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and a vast majority of Americans are opposed to any military action on Damascus.

“Considering such experience, if the US embarks on waging military action in Syria, it will certainly encounter a defeat,” he pointed out.

The US has been pressing for military action on Syria since a suspected chemical weapons attack in the suburbs of Damascus on August 21 which it blames on the forces loyal to Syrian President Bashar al-Assad.

The government of Syria has denied involvement and said the rebels were responsible.

Three polls out Monday, by CNN/ORC International, the Pew Research Center, and the Washington Post/ABC, indicated a strong majority of Americans do not want a congressional resolution to pass, and 63 percent or more oppose air strikes.

Russia, which has blocked US and British efforts to get a United Nations resolution to take action against Syria, appeared to open a path toward a solution Monday when it suggested a plan for Damascus to hand over its chemical weapons.

And US President Barack Obama said he would put off plans for a military strike against Syria if the country agrees to place its chemical weapons stockpile under international control.

 

 

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